Regional Guidelines on Public Participation in Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)

Draft for Consultation and Comment
Version 22 August 2016

8.3 Information to be provided and collected

  1. Throughout the investigation step, information of relevance to PAP and other stakeholders will regularly come to hand. Some of this information will be obtained from the community. Information should also be provided in a clear and coordinated manner to ensure that PAP and stakeholders can:
    • keep updated on the EIA investigation;
    • respond to new ideas and options that arise;
    • feel engaged in the EIA process; and
    • respond to proposed impact avoidance, management and mitigation measures.
  1. The information should be relevant and in a form that can be understood by the PAP and the other stakeholders. This means that technical documents should be explained in simple terms in the local language. It also means that maps, drawings, diagrams, charts, brochures, and other key information or documents should be left with the community to discuss further.
  1. All documentation provided to PAP and other stakeholders should be available on the internet, as well as in hard copy form for members of the general public to access for free in multiple locations, including:
    • the project proponent and EIA consultant’s offices;
    • at least one neutral venue near the project location, such as a local authority office or community facility;
    • local and/or national authority offices in major urban centers; and
    • the EIA Authority’s office.
  1. All material provided to the PAP should be treated as information in the public domain that can be accessed and distributed to people outside the local community if required. If there is a request for scientific and technical information to be explained, then the EIA consultant should arrange for a meeting with the appropriate experts and the community.
  1. Once finalized and submitted to the EIA Authority for review, the project proponent should also make the EIA Report publically available. This includes prominent public announcements about its availability, uploading it to the internet, and making hard copies available in multiple, convenient locations (both in the local community and major urban centers).
Table 10: EIA Investigation and Reporting step - information needs and disclosure

What type of information should be provided?

Who is responsible for providing the information?

Who should have access to the information?

Outline of project, including maps, draft plans and other available information, including methods and detailed work plan.

Details of the time frame for construction and outline of possible impacts (in general).

EIA consultant

Local communities, PAP, CSOs, local authorities, media

The Public Participation Plan and an explanation of this Plan .

Details of the EIA investigation plan

EIA consultant

Local communities, PAP, CSOs, local authorities, media

Presentation to the PAP and stakeholders on the EIA Preparation and information gathering.

Initial comments from the local communities, CSOs, and government responses

EIA consultant

Local communities, PAP, CSOs, local authorities, media.

For larger projects, this could include regional stakeholders and international NGOs.

Presentation of the draft EIA Report to the community before submitting to the EIA Authority – this should include the draft EMMP and any resettlement action plan and/or compensation.

EIA consultant

Local communities, PAP, CSOs, local authorities, media.

For larger projects, this could include regional stakeholders and international NGOs.

Written feedback on comments should be provided to the community, including publication on the project website

EIA consultant

Any individual or organization that provided input or comments during the drafting

Final EIA Report and EMMP submitted to EIA Authority

Project proponent,

EIA Authority

Local communities, PAP, CSOs, local authorities, media

Questions